Here's news about high-definition video recordings of opera, ballet, classical music, plays, fine-art documentaries, and paintings. I call these recordings "HDVDs." In the journal below are independent (and hard-to-find critical) reports on hundreds of HDVDs. Pick the best titles for your excelsisphere.

October 15. We are getting again into symphony titles and the existential issue of DVDitis. I just posted a story on a Mahler 2 recording at the Gewandhaus that might be considered DOA from the dread plague.

I recently put up a story about the 3rd version (!) of the same Giselle production published by Opus Arte. I recently posted a story about the Ekman Midsummer Night's Dream ballet (which has nothing to do with Shakespeare). I also just posted two stories about Shakespeare's The Tempest. The first is a definitive stage play version by the RSC. The second is an updated review of The Tempest movie staring Helen Mirren as Prospera (the female version of Prospero). The movie is streamlined - try it first. Then move on to the RSC "real deal", which is probably the best The Tempest ever made for home viewing.

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Entries in Magnolia Home Entertainment (1)

Wednesday
May132015

Ballet 422

Ballet 422 documentary film directed 2012-13 by Jody Lee Lipes. Follow young choreographer Justin Peck, who has 2 months to create a new work for the New York City Ballet. The title comes from the fact that the project will lead to the 442nd new ballet piece created for that company.

Director Lipes, working in a manner somewhat similar to the style of Frederick Wiseman, just records what happens with a minimum of explanation or other metadata. It appears that the music used for the dance is not revealed until the credits run and that the title does not include a recording of the finished work as it appeared to the audience when performed. (I assume that you do see substantial parts of the new work in early and dress rehearsals.) This will likely be absorbing for folks who love ballet but have never experienced the dancing life themselves.

We were excited to see that this documentary is in wide-screen and has surround sound. Were only stereo sound provided, we would probably have excluded this title from our Journal. Otherwise we know little about this---not even if it's in color or black and white. Grade: Help!

We plan to pre-order this and hope to review it by, say, June 5, 2015.

Please help us by writing a comment that we can place here as a mini-review of this title.